Memorial Day picnics cost $80 per house as meat prices soar 20%

With meat prices soaring and the cost of ground beef and chicken breast hitting record highs, Americans are paying more cash for Memorial Day picnics.

This summer, shoppers may be in for a shock when stocking up on holiday barbecues, with prices rising on nearly everything.

From April 2021 to April 2022, the average cost per pound of ground beef and chicken breast increased by more than 20%, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Burgers, hot dogs and other cookout items — like sliced ​​cheese, tomatoes and lettuce — have also gone up in price.

DailyMail.com analysts determined that this means the average American may want to spend more than $76 on the Memorial Day spread. The totals are based on the current prices of Walmart’s most popular picnic items in the US.

The spike in cookout prices reflects an overall increase in food prices, driven by the pandemic and rising inflation. Between April 2021 and 2022, food prices in the U.S. saw their biggest annual increase in 41 years, with the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reporting a 9.4% rise.

Grocery prices rose 10.8% for the year, not adjusted for seasonal fluctuations.

With meat prices soaring and the cost of ground beef and chicken breast hitting record highs, Americans are paying more cash for Memorial Day picnics.Meat prices seen at a grocery store in Hawaii on Friday

With meat prices soaring and the cost of ground beef and chicken breast hitting record highs, Americans are paying more cash for Memorial Day picnics.Meat prices seen at a grocery store in Hawaii on Friday

Average cost per pound of ground beef and chicken breast increased by more than 20% between April 2021 and April 2022

Average cost per pound of ground beef and chicken breast increased by more than 20% between April 2021 and April 2022

Soaring food prices aren’t limited to fresh meat and produce.

Frozen meat buns, excluding poultry, surged 15.7%, and frozen sausages rose 24.4%. CNN Analyst report. The price of hot dogs rose 14.5%.

Packaged hot dogs and hamburgers rose 11.2%, while ketchup and mustard rose 15.8% and 11.2%, respectively.

Fresh lettuce prices rose 13.8 percent, while tomatoes rose 4.8 percent.

Carbonated beverages, such as soda, increased by 13.9%. Likewise, Market Watch reported rising prices for alcoholic beverages. Beer prices rose 5% and wine prices rose 1.5%.

Also, the cost of burning the propane needed to burn most grills has increased.

As consumers encounter rising prices at grocery stores, some experts suggest that families should consider more cost-effective options for larger gatherings rather than grilling, such as ordering pizza.

The inflationary environment is starting to take hold, said Michael Nepveux, senior analyst for animal protein at Stable USA. Bloomberg. “We might have pasta or pizza instead of steak or chicken.”

DailyMail.com analysts determined that the average American may want to spend more than $76 on Memorial Day spreads.Totals are based on current prices of Walmart's most popular picnic items in the U.S.

DailyMail.com analysts determined that the average American may want to spend more than $76 on Memorial Day spreads.Totals are based on current prices of Walmart’s most popular picnic items in the U.S.

Social media shows higher prices for the same pork purchased in February 2022 compared to May 2022

Social media shows higher prices for the same pork purchased in February 2022 compared to May 2022

Food prices have risen due to a combination of factors, including bad weather that has cut crop yields and Russia’s invasion of Ukraine that has led to higher prices for wheat and other commodities.

Jonna Parker, head of IRI Fresh, advises shoppers to try leveraging store sales and buying store brands, which typically cost less than name-brand products.

‘[Grocers are] Really want to increase foot traffic,” she told CNN. “So they could suffer a lost profit or even a loss on one key Memorial Day item to try to get other items. [shopping] basket. ‘

However, market researchers warn that despite occasional sales, food prices are likely to continue to rise.

“I think we’re still going to see year-over-year growth,” Parker said. “I’m guessing it’ll still be 5% to 10% higher than last year’s Memorial Day.”

The U.S. is battling rising inflation, which hit its highest level in more than four decades in March

The U.S. is battling rising inflation, which hit its highest level in more than four decades in March

The rising costs were also reflected in U.S. gasoline prices, which surged to record highs again on Sunday, hitting an all-time high of $4.61 a gallon. That figure is more than 50 percent higher than the cost of a gallon a year ago.

Experts predict that by late summer, the price of a gallon could exceed the $6 mark — as the cost of pumping oil in West Coast cities like Los Angeles and San Francisco hit that mark earlier this month.

Last week, the price of a gallon in all 50 U.S. states exceeded $4, an unprecedented difference.

Meanwhile, the U.S. is battling rising inflation, which hit its highest level in more than 40 years in March.

A report from the Labor Department on May 11 said the consumer price index rose 0.3% in April from the previous month and 8.3% from a year earlier, while inflation rose 8.5% in March.

President Joe Biden blamed Russian President Vladimir Putin for rising U.S. inflation, saying in April: “Putin’s invasion of Ukraine has driven up gas prices and food prices around the world.”

At 79, the oldest U.S. president in history, Joe Biden explained at the time: “Ukraine and Russia are one or two of the largest wheat producers in the world. We were three. They were shut down. We looked at yesterday’s inflation data. to this point.

All industries report price increases due to inflation

All industries report price increases due to inflation

U.S. gasoline prices surged to record highs again on Sunday, hitting an all-time high of $4.61 a gallon

U.S. gasoline prices surged to record highs again on Sunday, hitting an all-time high of $4.61 a gallon

The White House even dubbed the surge a “#PutinPriceHike,” vowing that the president would do everything in his power to protect Americans from “the pain of the surge.”

Many were quick to point out that it was illogical to claim that the war that started a few months ago had caused a year of inflation.

Critics also claim that Biden’s recent policy shifts on energy and fuels have created “supply problems” in the gasoline market.

Biden blamed the crisis on chronic supply chain disruptions related to the economy’s rapid rebound from the pandemic, Russia’s invasion of Ukraine and the rapid rise in inflation during his presidency.

He said his government would ease price increases by shrinking the government’s budget deficit and promoting competition in industries such as meat processing, which are dominated by a handful of industry giants.