Demystifying royal visit touches serious topics, but also light moments

Hello Royal Observer. This is a special edition newsletter following Prince Charles and Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall’s three-day visit to Canada last week. Read this online? register here Send it to your inbox.

It came as a surprise to some in the room when Prince Charles attended the pep talk in Yellowknife on Thursday.

“No one thought he would, but he did have a dance that showed he really cared and was willing to help,” Ndilǫ Yellowknife Danny Aboriginal Chief Fred Sangris told CBC News.

Sangris said he and other leaders spoke with Charles about reconciliation, boarding schools, giant mine rehabilitation projects and housing shortages.

“I think he got it. He was really attentive and listened to our concerns.”

On the final day of Prince Charles and Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall’s three-day visit to Canada, it’s time to inspire and spend time with leaders. The tour is part of an effort to commemorate Queen Elizabeth’s Platinum Jubilee and the monarch’s 70th anniversary, and takes the couple from St. John’s to Ottawa and finally to the Northwest Territories.

Prince Charles and Camilla attended a ceremony at the Heart Gardens of St John’s Government House on Tuesday. (Paul Daly/The Canadian Press)

Charles and Camilla attended events and spoke to people about issues ranging from climate change to Indigenous issues, which Charles acknowledged in a speech on Thursday with many serious moments.

“Our visit has deepened our understanding of this important moment in our Canadian journey,” he said.

“I was so moved to meet the boarding school survivors who shared their experiences with such courage. On behalf of my wife and myself, I want to acknowledge their pain and express our hearts to them, their families All leaders have shared with me the importance of advancing reconciliation in Canada.”

There were lighter periods too, such as when Charles encountered a life-size wool bust of himself as part of an effort to promote wool and its sustainability. He and Camilla also drank a few pints of beer at Quidi Vidi Brewery in St. John’s.

Prior to the visit, there was some discussion about how much interest there would be given the relatively short duration of the visit, and the discussions that such visits typically generate around the relevance and future of the monarchy.

In this case, Charles and Camilla are welcomed wherever they go.

Prince Charles met and greeted residents at the National War Memorial in Ottawa on Wednesday. (Chris Jackson/Getty Images)

“What stood out to me was the warm welcome that Charles and Camilla received everywhere they traveled,” Toronto royal author and historian Caroline Harris said in an interview Friday.

Noting that the visit had “a huge emphasis on listening to Canadians from all walks of life,” she said she was also struck by “the popularity of the itinerary,” focusing on Indigenous reconciliation, climate change and sustainable financing, as well as the Time for Ukrainian Canadians to meet.

While in Ottawa, Charles and Camilla visited Byward Market. When they meet and talk to local farmers and entrepreneurs, they “seem to really like them,” Harris said.

It remains to be seen whether the way the tour unfolds, and how Charles and Camilla are received, will affect future royal visits.

“Certainly longer trips will allow them to visit more parts of the country and engage with more people, so there will be interest in seeing what subsequent royal tours are like and whether they are still very important,” Harris said. Short, goals like this, or whether we’ll see some slightly longer tours in the future.”

Prince Charles and Camilla attended a traditional prayer service at a Ukrainian church in Ottawa on Wednesday. (Paul Chiasson/The Canadian Press)

Charles appeared to be shocked by his and Camilla’s experience and said they were “very grateful for their warmth and hospitality”.

“As we began our journey in St John’s earlier this week – to mark the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee by celebrating the spirit of people and service – our greatest hope was that we could hear directly from Canadians and communicate with them study,” he said in his speech. Thursday’s speech.

“That hope has come true. We cherish the way so many people share their experiences, their thoughts and their role models with us.”

He said they would remain in “close contact,” including through the Canadian organization to which he and Camilla belong.

“Most importantly, we will be watching closely the next chapter in this country’s extraordinary story — and doing so with the greatest love and admiration for what Canada and Canadians stand for in the world.”

day to day

Camilla smiles as she meets students at Assumption Elementary School in Vanier, Ont., on Wednesday. (Carlos Osorio/Canadian Press)

Here’s CBC’s coverage of royal visits over the past few days:

  • In St John’s on Tuesday, the royal couple toured the provincial council, the lieutenant governor’s mansion and the picturesque village of Credivedi. 4.5 hour tour This includes themes from gloomy to celebratory.

  • Ottawa marks Wednesday maximum stay timeand saw Prince Charles and Camilla visit a city he recently called “the legendary capital at the heart of a great nation.”

  • In the Northwest Territories on Thursday, a pair of Yellowknife First Nations MPs said Prince Charles and Camilla very polite and interested Learning about Deneh culture.

Prince Charles visited the melting Deta Ice Road on Thursday. The ice road connecting Yellowknife and Deta through Great Slave Lake in winter usually opens in late December, but in recent years it has been delayed to early January. (Jacob King/Getty Images)

Royal visits inevitably spark discussions and debates about the monarchy and its future. Here’s CBC’s coverage of this over the past week or so:

WATCH | Why it’s so hard to give up Canada’s constitutional monarchy:

Why Abandoning Canada’s Constitutional Monarchy Is Nearly Impossible

Andrew Chang discusses Canada’s challenging process of severing ties from the British monarchy and its impact on Indigenous communities across the country.

unexpected appearance

Queen Elizabeth visited Paddington station in central London on Tuesday to mark the completion of the Crossrail project, ahead of the opening of the new Elizabeth Line rail service next week. (Andrew Matthews/AFP/Getty Images)

Queen Elizabeth has made few public appearances in recent months, so came a surprise When the 96-year-old officially opened a tube line named after her in central London this week.

Health and mobility issues have limited her official appearances outside her residence. Last week, Prince Charles read the Queen’s speech at the opening of the British Parliament in her place.

But the Queen appeared at the Royal Windsor Horse Show last weekend and reports suggest she hopes to attend the Chelsea Flower Show in London next week.

Attention in early June will also be on how much she will be able to do over the long weekend to mark her platinum jubilee.

  • Do you have plans to celebrate the Platinum Jubilee in Canada or the UK? Email The Royal Fascinator. We will follow up in the next newsletter.

royal citable

“We must listen to the truth about the lived experiences of Indigenous peoples, and we should strive to better understand their pain and suffering. We all have a responsibility to listen, understand and act to advance the relationship between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples in Canada. ”

— Prince Charles and Camilla wrapped up their visit during a speech in Yellowknife on Thursday.

Prince Charles shook hands with local representatives on Thursday before leaving Yellowknife for Britain after a three-day visit to Canada. (Chris Jackson/Getty Images)

royal reading

  1. Art and photography depicting Queen Elizabeth’s 70 years of monarchy reveal some interesting truthsauthor Holly Williams for the BBC.

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