Dame Deborah James looks stunning in charity collection as her Bowelbabe fund tops £6.5m

Since announcing the start of her hospice, Sir Dame Deborah James has shared a series of stunning new photos to celebrate raising more than £6.5 million for her cancer fundraiser.

The 40-year-old BBC podcaster has had stage four bowel cancer since December 2016, but since her health improved in early May, she launched the Bowel Babe Fund to continue her legacy.

She also launched a new clothing line with 100% of profits going to charity, and she showed off her stunning collection on Instagram today.

“I’m wearing a different outfit every day between now and my death. It sounds a little weird and morbid, but I absolutely love it,” she said.

This week, she launched a collection with InTheStyle for Bowel Baby Fund.

InTheStyle’s collections are available to pre-order until 8am Monday, and 100% of profits will go to Bowel Babe Cancer Research UK.

Since announcing the start of her end-of-life care, Mrs Deborah James has raised £6.5 million for her cancer fundraiser.

Since announcing the start of her end-of-life care, Mrs Deborah James has raised £6.5 million for her cancer fundraiser.

Since being diagnosed with stage 4 bowel cancer in December 2016, Deborah said designing the collection allowed her to focus on things beyond the disease.

In her photoshoot with Prince William during his visit, she wore an InTheStyle number from her collection before the launch was announced.

In a video on her Instagram announcing the news, Dame Deborah answers questions about the series.

She revealed the process of designing her collection, saying she was living a “mixed” life at the time, working between home and hospital.

But she said: “We did it, we did it. I enjoyed it. It brought me to life and gave me other things to think about.

The 40-year-old BBC podcaster has had stage four bowel cancer since December 2016, but as her health improved in early May, she launched the Bowel Babe Fund to continue her legacy

The 40-year-old BBC podcaster has had stage four bowel cancer since December 2016, but as her health improved in early May, she launched the Bowel Babe Fund to continue her legacy

This week she launched a collection with InTheStyle (pictured wearing a dress from the collection) to raise money for the Gut Baby Fund, which has reached £6.5m since she announced her end of life care for Woking's parents s home

This week she launched a collection with InTheStyle (pictured wearing a dress from the collection) to raise money for the Gut Baby Fund, which has reached £6.5m since she announced her end of life care for Woking’s parents s home

When Deborah first shared the BowelBabe Fund on May 9, the 40-year-old wrote in an Instagram post: “A message I never wanted to write. We’ve tried everything, but my body just can’t play.

“My active care has stopped and now I’m being moved to home hospice with my incredible family by my side and the focus is on making sure I’m pain free and spending time with them.

“No one knows how much time I have left, but I can’t walk, I sleep most of the time, and most things I take for granted are pipe dreams. I know we’ve left no stone unturned.

In the three weeks since she first shared the fundraiser on JustGiving, she has beaten the £250,000 target she set for Cancer Research UK, reaching over £6,570,000 by Saturday 28 May, with over 302,000 supporters taking part in

In the three weeks since she first shared the fundraiser on JustGiving, she has beaten the £250,000 target she set for Cancer Research UK, reaching over £6,570,000 by Saturday 28 May, with over 302,000 supporters taking part in

“But even with all the innovative cancer drugs in the world or some amazing new breakthrough, my body couldn’t go on any longer.”

The former vice-chancellor-turned-cancer campaigner from London has been told she may not live for five years – a milestone that will pass in autumn 2021.

Earlier this year, the mother-of-two who shared her Hugo, 14, and Eloise, 12, with husband Sebastian, announced she “nearly died” in hospital, saying it was her “most shy” The tough” part. She battled cancer for five years and was hospitalized earlier this month.

She is now in hospice at her parents’ home in Woking for bowel cancer and was told sun She was “afraid to fall asleep” because she didn’t know how long she had left.

She added that she felt a “deep love” from her family, saying: “I think my family is vulnerable, they are all incredible – going out of their way to look after me and take care of me.”

A rose was named after her at this week’s Chelsea Flower Show, and last week, she released her book “How to Live When You Might Die,” which went viral after being shared on her Instagram page. Topping the Amazon charts, she has over 888,000 followers.